T H E   B U D O   C E N T E R

Action  Martial Arts

OFFICIAL TRAINING CENTER 
FOR KIM ALLEY MODELS!  
 Runway-Modeling-Fashion-Photography-Video

SPORTS DEVELOPMENT THROUGH MARTIAL ARTS

NBA player have been using the martial arts for many years.  The skills you learn from the martial arts enables players to excel at positioning, footwork, shifting their weight, understanding how to use the most their strengths to downplay their weaknesses. They can play against guys that outweighed them by 100 pounds. And they could not match the quickness, or smoothness of a martial artist.

Los Angeles Lakers-Kobe Bryant

Kobe Bryant- Martial Arts focuses on maximizing speed while using the least movements possible. The discipline has helped him gain both mental strength and physical prowess that would otherwise be difficult to achieve through basketball practice alone.

Los Angeles Lakers-Shaquille O'Neal

Very few people would dare get in the ring with Shaq, factor in the fact that he practices Martial Arts and you can bet you’ll be in a world of pain. Being big doesn’t mean a thing though if you don’t have the proper control over your body, that’s where martial arts training may come in handy. The training and endurance gained through the practice of many of the martial arts Shaq has chosen, has made him a force not to be reckoned with.

University of Wisconsin-Bronson Koenig

Watching basketball players during March’s big tournament is more than just entertaining – it’s awe-inspiring. These players are coordinated, fast and dexterous. Of course, they work hard to learn the skills they use on the court, and some of them develop their abilities through martial arts. 

University of Wisconsin player Bronson Koenig knows the benefits of martial arts first hand. He started training during high school, along with his basketball team, to develop strength and skills he could use during the season. He continues to train with the same martial-arts instructor.

Learning a martial sport helps these athletes develop discipline, coordination, strength and agility: all things they use on the court.

For years, many NFL players have used martial arts as part of their workout regimen.  Martial arts training has tremendous potential to improve various aspects of football; including striking, avoiding and blocking strikes, wrestling and grappling, joint control, drive blocking, breakfalling (falling to the ground safely) and conditioning (speed, strength, stamina, skill levels and flexibility).

Arizona Cardinals-Chike Okeafor

"All these forms are self defense", said Chike Okeafor, a Seahawks defensive end who played for the 49ers and defensive end for the Arizona Cardinals.  "Is a man trying to put his hands on you?" Yes or no?  If it's yes, then you get his hands off you, you don't let him put them on you and you punish him for trying to.  That's martial arts.  That's football." 

San Diego Chargers-Lorenzo Neal

San Diego Chargers fullback Lorenzo Neal claims the martial arts training helps him as well with balance and body control that translates well to the football field. 

Pittsburg Steelers-Max Starks

Pittsburgh Steelers offensive lineman Max Starks.  At 6'8, 340 lbs, Starks is a large man to handle.  He says he started training because his older brother operated a martial arts school and ended up helping out his sibling.  He would try different moves and positions, and became a fan of the sport.  "To be a successful lineman in my position, you have to have great technique in order to go against guys who are faster and potentially stronger guys".  You have to have flawless technique.  It doesn't matter how big you are, it matters how much of a technical fighter you are.  Fearlessness and toughness are truly the basic principles.  

Washington Redskins-Michael Westbrook

The greatest advantage for current NFL player to gain from the martial arts is the cardio training.  "What happens is the adrenaline is different here than it is on the field," claimed Westbrook.  "It will teach them how to understand how not to get tired, how to relax and how to breathe.  It's a different cardio.  Once NFL players come in the gym and see how tired they get, they want to keep doing it.  When they go back to football, these four quarters are nothing."

Philadelphia Phillies-Rudy Seanez

Rudy Seanez now playing for the Philadelphia Phillies said his conditioning has improved because of his martial arts training and it has allowed him to prolong his career, which began in Cleveland in 1989 and has taken him to nine organizations (some more than once).  And he has enjoyed martial arts so immensely that he plans to pursue it more seriously when his playing days are over. 


"Martial arts is going to allow me to keep going another couple of years," said Seanes.  Overall, I have a better strength and flexibility than when I just did heavy weightlifting. Now, I have what I would call more functional strength.  


He discovered that it not only enhanced his overall physical strength, but it also gave him peace of mind - if only because it provided him with the self-assurance that he could handle himself in potentially dangerous situations.  It's that confidence factor, as he calls it, that has helped him avoid "different situations" that come up.  


Seanez says he has become a better pitcher because of martial arts, especially in bases-loaded situations.  "I reach back and instead of getting worked up, I find that I become calm," he said.  "But you develop that in martial arts, the ability to be in control."


With one quick, calculated motion, Texas Rangers pitcher Kevin Millwood grabs teammate Kameron Loe's right leg, lifts it up and slams Loe's back onto a cushioned mat. 


After the intense workout, Millwood admits, "this is fun."


I wanted to do something different and make sure I was completely ready.  I'm getting older, and I can tell.  I've got to be in better shape.  And this is a fun way to do it."


To help make 2008 better from the first pitch, Milwood spends two days a week training.  It was more that motivation after a poor season that pushed Millwood to make the short drive from his house to the studio last October.  Boredom was a big factor.  Millwood complained to the Ranger's strength and conditioning coach, that jogging on the treadmill or riding a stationary bike had become a necessity that he dreaded.  "I've tried everything to find something he likes to get him enthusiastic,"Vazquez said. "He doesn't get excited about workouts at all.  Everything we've done, we do becaues he knows he has to.  But he really likes this and enjoys going."


Martial arts has allowed Millwood to get some aggression and get his heart pumping at the same time.  But it also helps his mental game.  



Texas Rangers-Kevin Millwood and Kameron Loe

With one quick, calculated motion, Texas Rangers pitcher Kevin Millwood grabs teammate Kameron Loe's right leg, lifts it up and slams Loe's back onto a cushioned mat. 


After the intense workout, Millwood admits, "this is fun."


I wanted to do something different and make sure I was completely ready.  I'm getting older, and I can tell.  I've got to be in better shape.  And this is a fun way to do it."


To help make 2008 better from the first pitch, Milwood spends two days a week training.  It was more that motivation after a poor season that pushed Millwood to make the short drive from his house to the studio last October.  Boredom was a big factor.  Millwood complained to the Ranger's strength and conditioning

coach, that jogging on the treadmill or riding a stationary bike had become a necessity that he dreaded.  "I've tried everything to find something he likes to get him enthusiastic,"Vazquez said. "He doesn't get excited about workouts at all.  Everything we've done, we do becaues he knows he has to.  But he really likes this and enjoys going."


Martial arts has allowed Millwood to get some aggression and get his heart pumping at the same time.  But it also helps his mental gam